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Healthier school meals: How 5 districts are faring

May 6, 2014 • National News


In this Tuesday, April 29, 2014 photo, Becky Domokos-Bays, the director of food and nutrition services at Alexandria City Public Schools, holds up a tray of food during lunch at the Patrick Henry Elementary School in Alexandria, Va. Starting next school year, pasta and other grain products in schools will have to be whole-grain rich, or more than half whole grain. The requirement is part of a government effort to make school lunches and breakfasts healthier. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two years in, schools are having mixed success putting new healthier school lunch rules in place.

Some report that students are excited about a variety of healthier options and have barely noticed the changes. Others say some kids are throwing fruits and vegetables away and balking at whole grains.

The requirements are part of a government effort to make school lunches and breakfasts healthier. Championed by first lady Michelle Obama, the new standards have been phased in over the last two school years, with more changes coming in 2014.

Some schools are asking Congress and the Agriculture Department to roll back some of the requirements. Their main concerns: finding enough whole grain-rich foods that kids like, lowering sodium levels and keeping fruits and vegetables from ending up in the trash.

Not all schools are required to follow the requirements, but most do. If Login to read more

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