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Oil mars Ala. swamp months after crude train crash

March 15, 2014 • National News


CORRECTS DATE FROM MAY 5 TO MARCH 5 – Crude oil seeps into water in an isolated wetland near Aliceville, Ala., on Wednesday, March 5, 2014. A train carrying nearly 3 million gallons of oil crashed at the site in November 2013, resulting in the pollution. Environmental regultors say cleanup and containment work is continuing, but critics contend the Alabama accident and others show the danger of transporting large amounts of oil in tanker trains. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)

ALICEVILLE, Ala. (AP) — Environmental regulators promised an aggressive cleanup after a tanker train hauling 2.9 million gallons of crude oil derailed and burned in a west Alabama swamp in early November amid a string of North American oil train crashes.

So why is dark, smelly crude oil still oozing into the water four months later?

The isolated wetland smelled like a garage when a reporter from The Associated Press visited last week, and the charred skeletons of burned trees rose out of water covered with an iridescent sheen and swirling, weathered oil. A snake and a few minnows were some of the few signs of life.

An environmental group now says it has found ominous traces of oil moving downstream along an unnamed tributary toward a big creek and the Tombigbee River, less than 3 miles away. And the mayor of a North Dakota town where a similar crash occurred in December fears ongoing oil pollution problems in his community, too.

As the nation considers new means of transporting fuel over long distances, critics of crude oil trains have cited the Alabama derailment as an example of what can go wrong when tanker cars carrying millions of gallons of so-called Bakken crude leave the tracks. Questions about the effectiveness of the Alabama cleanup come as the National Transportation Safety Board considers tighter rules for the rail transportation of Bakken oil, which is produced mainly by the fracking process in the Bakken region of North Dakota and Montana. Oil production is increasing there, boosting the amount of oil being transported across the country.

Environmentalist John Wathen, who has Login to read more

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