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Murillo painting going up at Detroit art museum

February 6, 2014 • Entertainment


This photo provided by the Detroit Institute of Arts shows a post-conservation image of 17th-century Spanish artist Bartolomé Esteban Murillo’s “The Infant Saint John the Baptist in the Wilderness.” The rediscovered painting is going on display at the Detroit Institute of Arts and was spotted by a DIA curator during a visit to an historic home in suburban Detroit last year. It’s on loan to the museum for five years. The painting previously belonged to an Italian merchant, a Capuchin convent and the Duke of Westminster. In 1926, it entered the collection of Alfred and Matilda Wilson, who kept it in their home, Meadow Brook Hall, in Rochester, Mich. (AP Photo/Detroit Institute of Arts)

DETROIT (AP) — A rediscovered painting by the 17th-century Spanish artist Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (muhr-EE’-yoh) is on display at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

A museum curator spotted “The Infant Saint John the Baptist in the Wilderness” during a visit to a historic home in suburban Detroit last year.

The work went on view Thursday at the Detroit Institute of Arts. It’s on loan to the museum for five years.

The museum says it’s the first time the painting’s been exhibited at a U.S. art museum. It previously belonged to an Italian merchant, a Capuchin convent and the Duke of Westminster.

The painting entered the collection of Alfred and Matilda Wilson in 1926. They kept it in Meadow Brook Hall, their home in what’s now the city of Rochester Hills, Mich.

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