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US documents raise questions on Munich art hoard

November 7, 2013 • Entertainment


A painting from Max Liebermann “Zwei Reiter am Strande” (“Two riders on the beach”) is projected on a screen during a news conference in Augsburg, southern Germany, Tuesday, Nov.5, 2013, on the art found in Munich. A hoard of more than 1,400 art works found last year at a Munich apartment includes previously unknown pieces by artists including Marc Chagall, German investigators said Tuesday, adding that they face a hugely complicated task to establish where the art came from. (AP Photo/Kerstin Joensson)

BERLIN (AP) — U.S. military documents are deepening the mystery surrounding the more than 1,400 artworks found in a Munich apartment.

In the chaotic aftermath of World War II, the American military seized 20 boxes of art from German dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt in Aschbach in December 1945, according to documents located by The Associated Press in the U.S. National Archives in Washington.

Gurlitt had worked closely with the Nazi regime in the 1930s to sell art it considered “degenerate” to fill its war coffers.

American investigators at the time expressed doubts about Gurlitt’s claims to the works, but they eventually decided that in most cases he was the rightful owner. So on Dec. 15, 1950, the U.S. returned 206 items to him: 115 paintings, 19 drawings and 72 “various other objects.”

At least three of the artworks documented by the Americans have now re-surfaced, found hidden in the Munich apartment of Gurlitt’s Login to read more

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