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Immigration bill knot: ‘Special’ citizenship path

September 2, 2013 • National News


FILE – In this Feb. 5, 2013, file photo Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, seated left, waits for the start of the House Judiciary Committee hearing on immigration reform on Capitol Hill in Washington. As Congress wrestles with the legislation a central question is whether 11 million immigrants already in the United States illegally should get a path to citizenship. “There should be a pathway to citizenship, not a special pathway and not no pathway,” says Chaffetz. “But there has to be a legal, lawful way to go through this process that works, and right now it doesn’t.” Other representatives from left are Trent Franks, R-Ariz., Tom Marino, R-Pa., Doug Collins, R-Fla., Raul Labrador, R-Idaho, Ted Poe, R-Texas, Trey Gowdy, R-S.C. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Congress wrestles with immigration legislation, a central question is whether the 11 million immigrants already in the United States illegally should get a path to citizenship.

The answer from a small but growing number of House Republicans is “yes,” just as long as it’s not the “special” path advocated by Democrats and passed by the Senate.

“There should be a pathway to citizenship — not a special pathway and not no pathway,” Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, told ABC 4 Utah after speaking at a recent town hall meeting in his district. “But there has to be a legal, lawful way to go through this process that works, and right now it doesn’t.”

Many House Republicans say people who illegally crossed the border or overstayed their visas should not be rewarded with a special, tailor-made solution that awards them a prize of American citizenship, especially when millions are waiting in line to attempt the process through current legal Login to read more

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