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Argentine high court considers media monopoly law

August 29, 2013 • Business


Government supporters gather in front of the Courts’ building to watch on screens a hearing on the country’s media law in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013. The future of broadcast television and other news media in Argentina is at stake as the Supreme Court hears arguments on the constitutionality of a law designed to break up privately held media monopolies. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — The future of broadcast television and other news media in Argentina now rests with its Supreme Court, which began hearing arguments Wednesday over a law the government says will foster competition by breaking up privately held monopolies in the information business.

The 2009 law’s stiff limits on cable TV ownership would force Grupo Clarin to break itself apart, demolishing a leading opposition voice against government power. Clarin is Argentina’s biggest media company, with holdings that include one of Latin America’s biggest newspapers, magazines, a major cable TV system and broadcast TV and radio stations.

Each side offered five “friends of the court” who took sides arguing for freedom of expression in the hearings, which were broadcast live on Argentine television.

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