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Risk for Obama in pursuing morning-after pill case

April 7, 2013 • Business


This undated image made available by Teva Women’s Health shows the packaging for their Plan B One-Step (levonorgestrel) tablet, one of the brands known as the “morning-after pill.” In a scathing rebuke of the Obama administration, a federal judge ruled Friday that age restrictions on over-the-counter sales of the morning-after pill are “arbitrary, capricious and unreasonable” and must end within 30 days. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Edward Korman of New York means consumers of any age could buy emergency contraception without a prescription _ instead of women first having to prove they’re 17 or older, as they do today. And it could allow Plan B One-Step to move out from behind pharmacy counters to the store counters. (AP Photo/Teva Women’s Health)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama supports requiring girls younger than 17 to see a doctor before buying the morning-after pill. But fighting that battle in court comes with its own set of risks.

A federal judge in New York on Friday ordered the Food and Drug Administration to lift age restrictions on the sale of emergency contraception, ending the requirement that buyers show proof they’re 17 or older if they want to buy it without a prescription.

The ruling accused the Obama administration in no uncertain terms of letting the president’s pending re-election cloud its judgment when it set the age limits in 2011.

“The motivation for the secretary’s action was obviously political,” U.S. District Judge Edward Korman wrote in Login to read more

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