MENU

Crisis hotlines turning to text to reach teens

March 29, 2013 • Business


In this Tuesday, March 26, 2013 photo, Volunteer Sophia (last names not given) views the home page of the Teen Line center, that takes text messages and phone calls from teens seeking help, at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. As more teens have gone mobile, using their phones as an extension of themselves, hotline providers have tried to keep up. Some text providers operate in specific towns, counties or regions and-or rely on trained teen volunteers to handle the load across modes of communication.(AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

NEW YORK (AP) — They stream in from teens around the United States, cries for help often sent in by text message.

“I feel like committing suicide,” one text read. “What’s the suicide hotline number?” Another asked: “How do you tell a friend they need to go to rehab?”

DoSomething.org, an organization that encourages activism among young adults, gets plenty of text messages asking for help, but it isn’t a hotline. So the nonprofit’s CEO, Nancy Lublin, is leading an effort to establish an around-the-clock text number across trigger issues for teens in the hope that it will become their emergency line, perhaps reaching those who wouldn’t otherwise seek help using more established methods of telephone talking or computer-based chat.

“Most of the texts we get like this are about things like being bullied,” Lublin said. “A lot of things are about relationships, so we’ll get texts from kids about breakups, or ‘I like a boy, what should I Login to read more

Related Posts

Comments are closed.

« »