MENU

Bad math at idle Neb. nuke plant prompts questions

January 21, 2013 • Business


FILE – This July 14, 2011 file photo shows the Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant being surrounded by the rising waters from the Missouri River, in Fort Calhoun, Neb. A nuclear reactor in Nebraska, idled for almost two years by a laundry list of problems, is coming under increased regulatory scrutiny due to some bad math in its 40-year-old design and the use of Teflon even though it tends to disintegrate when exposed to high radiation. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A nuclear reactor in Nebraska, idled for almost two years by a laundry list of problems, is coming under increased regulatory scrutiny due to some bad math in its 40-year-old design and the use of Teflon even though it tends to disintegrate when exposed to high radiation.

The new issues revealed at recent public meetings could further delay the resumption of operations at Fort Calhoun that critics assert is already costing too much to fix and should remain shuttered forever.

The Omaha Public Power District imposed a 6.9 percent increase in electricity rates this month for customers across southeast Nebraska, largely to finance a $143 million bill to fix some 450 problems and rehabilitate the nuclear plant that was closed in April 2011.

But that price tag does not account for the plant’s most recent concerns.

The utility says one of its engineers discovered that bad calculations in the design of the plant that opened in 1973 mean that some support Login to read more

Related Posts

Comments are closed.

« »