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Romney never overcame bailout opposition in Ohio

November 12, 2012 • Business


In this Nov. 6, 2012 photo, United Auto Workers member Harry Van Uden attends a rally on Election Day at the UAW Region 1 technical training center in Warren, Mich. Only a couple of weeks after Barack Obama won the presidency in 2008, the man who would become his Republican challenger in the next election penned a New York Times column with a fateful headline: “Let Detroit Go Bankrupt.” Those four words would haunt Mitt Romney across the Rust Belt, where auto manufacturing remains an economic pillar _ especially Ohio, which every successful GOP presidential nominee has carried, and his home state of Michigan, where his father was an auto company executive and governor. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

DETROIT (AP) — Only a couple of weeks after Barack Obama won the presidency in 2008, the man who would become his Republican challenger in the next election penned a New York Times column with a fateful headline: “Let Detroit Go Bankrupt.”

Those four words would haunt Mitt Romney across the Rust Belt, where auto manufacturing remains an economic pillar — especially in Ohio, a state that every successful GOP presidential nominee has carried, and in his home state of Michigan, where his father was an auto executive and governor.

Romney’s opposition to the federal rescue of General Motors and Chrysler didn’t necessarily seal his fate in those two crucial states. But no other issue hung in the background for so long. And nothing that Romney tried — his many visits, the millions spent on ads, his efforts to explain and refine his position — could overcome it.

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