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Storm leaves Connecticut Gold Coast shaken

November 5, 2012 • National News


This Oct. 30, 2012 photo shows a house destroyed during Superstorm Sandy on Fairfield Beach Road in Fairfield, Conn. While Connecticut was spared the destruction seen in New York and New Jersey, many communities along the shoreline, including some of the wealthiest towns in America, were struggling with one of the most severe storms in generations. (AP Photo/The Connecticut Post, Autumn Driscoll) MANDATORY CREDIT

WESTPORT, Conn. (AP) — The floodwaters churned by Superstorm Sandy damaged waterfront homes along Connecticut’s southwest coast, and turned the charming center of tony Westport into a ghost town, with sandbags lining streets of flooded-out boutique shops.

A fire at the height of last week’s storm destroyed three Greenwich mansions, and hundreds of Fairfield homeowners waited days for water to recede so they could return to their homes.

While Connecticut was spared the destruction seen in New York and New Jersey, many communities along the shoreline — including some of the wealthiest towns in America — were struggling with one of the most severe storms in generations.

For some living along Connecticut’s vaunted “Gold Coast,” the effects of Sandy and earlier storms were enough to reconsider life on the waterfront.

“We feel traumatized and displaced,” said Jessica Levitt, the mother of two young children while waiting last week for the waters to subside in Fairfield, in a neighborhood of modest and more expensive homes. “Everyone is walking around with these blank looks on their faces. Nobody knows where to go and what to do.”

The storm battered the entire Connecticut shoreline, destroying homes in cities and towns including Milford, East Haven and Norwalk. Three people were killed.

In Bridgeport, the state’s largest city, flooding and widespread power outages complicated the lives of thousands.

“There’s no heat. Our food is destroyed,” said Yvonne Figueroa, 21, of Bridgeport, who said she could not get paid because the Fairfield clothing store where she works lost power. “I haven’t been to work. I’m broke.”

But the storm upended life most dramatically perhaps in the wealthier towns of Fairfield County, which is known for its hedge funds, New York City commuters and consistently high ratings for quality of life.

Along the shoreline community of Westport, remnants of Sandy’s Login to read more

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