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Judge blocks Fla.’s new welfare drug testing law

October 25, 2011 • National News


In this Saturday, Sept 24, 2011, photo, Florida Gov. Rick Scott delivers his keynote address at a Florida Republican Party Presidency 5 Convention in Orlando, Fla. A federal judge temporarily blocked Florida’s new law that requires welfare applicants to pass a drug test before receiving the benefits on Monday, Oct. 24, 2011. The judge said it may violate the Constitution’s ban on unreasonable searches and seizures. Gov. Rick Scott was a proponent for law. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A federal judge temporarily blocked Florida’s new law that requires welfare applicants to pass a drug test before receiving benefits on Monday, saying it may violate the Constitution’s ban on unreasonable searches and seizures.

Judge Mary Scriven ruled in response to a lawsuit filed on behalf of a 35-year-old Navy veteran and single father who sought the benefits while finishing his college degree, but refused to take the test. The judge said there was a good chance plaintiff Luis Lebron would succeed in his challenge to the law based on the Fourth Amendment, which protects individuals from being unfairly searched.

The drug test can reveal a host of private medical facts Login to read more

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