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Shanghai subway crash revives safety concerns

September 29, 2011 • Business


A passenger looks at the notice board for the alternative ways to reach destinations at the closed Laoximen Station of Metro Line 10, located near Tuesday’s subway collision Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011. A crash on one of Shanghai’s newest subway lines is the latest stumble in China’s rush to roll out modern services, often sacrificing safety for fast results. (AP Photo)

SHANGHAI (AP) — A crash on one of Shanghai’s newest subway lines, the latest stumble in China’s rush to roll out modern services, is focusing attention on the use of high-tech signal systems that at times are anything but fail-safe.

The collision Tuesday, which the government says injured 284 people, revived complaints that China is sacrificing safety in its zeal for fast results.

The subway operator, Shanghai Shentong Metro Group, said one of its trains crashed into another near the city’s scenic Yuyuan Garden due to problems with signal systems supplied by a state-owned venture whose equipment was implicated in a deadly bullet train crash in July.

In a second statement reported by the official Xinhua News Agency, the metro company said a sudden loss of power caused the signal system to fail, forcing the trains to be operated manually. It said staff failed to follow proper management rules, which caused the accident.

It was not the first problem on the line. A mishap involving the misdirecting of a train two months earlier and a minor collision in 2009 on a different line had resulted in Login to read more

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